Beaufort Vineyard and Estate Winery

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By in pairing suggestion, recipes, whole food, plant-based Comments Off on BBQ mushroom sliders x Ça Beautage

BBQ mushroom sliders x Ça Beautage


This recipe should help you squeeze the last out of summer – smoky BBQ mushroom sandwiches, paired with 100% Beaufort-grown Ça Beautage. We’ve long since figured that Marechal Foch pairs like a charm with mushroom based dishes, so grab a bottle of the recently-released 2017 vintage Ça Beautage and give this recipe a go!


INGREDIENTS Makes 4 sandwiches/sliders

4 large portabello mushrooms

1/2 cup ketchup

1 tblsp molasses

2 tblsp white vinegar

1 tblsp demerara sugar

2 tbslp soy sauce

1 tbslp Dijon mustard

1 tsp sriracha (or your favourite hot sauce)

1/2 tsp sweet smoked paprika

1/2 tsp garlic powder

salt and pepper

*You will also need 4 buns or sliders (or you can use a baguette cut into 4 as we did in the photo)

*Other sandwich fixings of your choice; we used coleslaw and lettuce but we think red onion and avocado would be a great addition too!

METHOD

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Slice the mushrooms into .5cm slices and arrange on a baking tray in a single layer. Drizzle with a little olive oil, and season with some salt and pepper. Bake for 20-25minutes or until tender, turning once half way through the baking time. Set aside to cool slightly. In the meantime, prepare your BBQ sauce…
  2. Combine the ketchup, molasses, vinegar, sugar, soy sauce, mustard, sriracha, and spices with 4 tablespoons of water in a small saucepan. Bring to the boil over a high heat, stirring constantly.
  3. Reduce the heat and allow the sauce to simmer gently for approximately 10 minutes, or until the sauce has reduced and is thick and glossy. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  4. Toss the mushrooms in the hot BBQ sauce and divide between 4 buns. Add you favourite sandwich fixings and serve immediately.

 

By in winery news Comments Off on 2018 Epic release

2018 Epic release

The wait is over Epic fans! 2018 vintage is set for its tasting room debut on Thursday August 22nd. It’ll be on the list all weekend so be sure to stop by Thursday to Sunday from noon until 5pm for a sip.

Showcasing Epicure from Woodvine Estate in Comox, with 20% Ortega from Beaufort, this 100% Comox Valley grown blend offers a great snapshot of our cool, coastal terroir. It’s bright, crisp and lemon-hued, and we can’t wait to share it with you.

 

By in pairing suggestion, recipes, whole food, plant-based Comments Off on Guacamole x Ortega

Guacamole x Ortega

 

Life would be so dull without avocados, and tortilla chips! This is a super simple recipe for summertime snacking. Use ripe avocados and a vegetable masher for the best consistency. Make lots and keep leftovers in the fridge in a tall Tupperware container (or a glass jar) with a layer of olive oil on top to prevent oxidation.

Have you tried our 2018 Ortega yet? If not, stop by the tasting room soon! This guacamole is a perfect accompaniment to a chilled bottle of Ortega. Just add a couple pals and a big bowl of Abuelo’s corn tortilla chips. You can find Abuelo’s chips in our tasting room, as well as at the Courtenay Farmer’s Market on Saturdays.


INGREDIENTS Makes about a pint

4-5 large ripe avocados

1 medium tomato

1/4 of a small red onion

juice of 2 limes

1/2 tsp dried granulated garlic

1 tsp ground cumin

2 tsps ground coriander

2 large handfuls of cilantro

salt and pepper to taste

METHOD

  1. Peel and pit the avocados and place the flesh in a large bowl. Give them a rough mash.
  2. Finely chop the tomato (leave the skin on!) and the onion.
  3. Add the tomato, onion, lime juice, granulated garlic and spices to the avocados; mash to mix.
  4. Finely chop the cilantro (leaves and stalks), and add that to the guacamole. Give the mix one final mash (it should still be a little lumpy). Season to taste.
  5. Serve heaped up in a big bowl for dipping.

 

By in wine education Comments Off on Wine Tannins

Wine Tannins

Tannins are organic polyphenolic compounds that occur naturally in things like leaves, wood, nuts and certain fruits. Part of a plant’s defence mechanism, tannins are bitter tasting and astringent – in the natural world, they make things less tasty, and therefore less desirable, to both humans and animals. This allows the plant in question to establish itself and proliferate before someone (or something) gobbles it up.

If a wine is described as having a tannic structure, it will have had some contact with grape skins, seeds and stems during wine-making. Likely too, that it will have spent time aging in wood, for oak is rich in tannin. When it comes to tannins in wine – red wine – it’s a case of balance. Wines that are overly or aggressively tannic will dry your mouth out in a single sip; like you’ve just sucked the sleeve of a velvet smoking jacket. Tannins, you see, have this wonderful ability to dry out proteins – that dry, almost furry feeling in your mouth comes as a direct result of tannins going to work on amino acids in your saliva. Conversely, red wines with lower tannin levels can lack complexity. Since a major part of wine’s intrigue is what happens on your palate when you taste it, a little bit of astringency, a little bit of bitterness and certainly a little bit of ‘furriness’ is no bad thing, especially when you’re pairing red wine with food. It’s easy to counteract (or limit the effect of) tannins on your palate by pairing wines with protein rich foods. Fats also facilitate balancing tannins on the palate. Tannins are essential for a wine that’s intended for the cellar. Wines with no tannins, low tannins, or a ‘soft’ tannin profile will typically not age well at all.

Tannins in white wine are, usually, negligible. With a few notable exceptions (whites that have had extended maceration, and whites aged in wood), white wines are made in a way that limits the transfer of polyphenols from grape skins, seeds and stems to the actual juice.

And so, for a little experiment… cut open a new black tea bag and sprinkle the contents on your tongue. Chew on the dried leaves for a while before spitting it out. Note that furry sensation; that intense dryness and astringency; that bitterness and brownish residue on your tongue and teeth? Tannins!

By in Uncategorized, tasting room events, things to do in courtenay, winery news Comments Off on Mark your calendars

Mark your calendars

Pssst! The tasting room will open a little earlier than usual for the 2019 season – we’ll be back behind the bar from Friday April 19th, all through the summer and into fall on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays (noon until 5pm). We are looking forward to seeing you! Don’t forget to follow us on Instagram and check back here for news and updates…

 

By in things to do in courtenay, winery news, whole food, plant-based Comments Off on Plant-based pairing dinner @ Locals Courtenay

Plant-based pairing dinner @ Locals Courtenay

 

Beaufort is delighted to be collaborating with Locals Restaurant in Courtenay for Dine Around Comox Valley in 2019. Join us for a 5-course plant-based pairing dinner on Thursday 28th February at 6pm. Places are limited and will be sure to go fast. Contact Locals for more information or to reserve a ticket; 250-338-6493.

Tickets are $60 per person (meal only); or $95 per person for a fully paired meal. Ticket prices are plus tax and gratuity.

By in recipes, whole food, plant-based Comments Off on Red (or white, or rosé!) Wine Jelly

Red (or white, or rosé!) Wine Jelly

Not strictly a pairing recipe, but a recipe that calls for wine none-the-less. I know it’s hard to believe, but sometimes the best of us find ourselves with a collection of half finished bottles on the kitchen counter or window ledge. Rather than discarding the contents (even if past its prime for drinking), use those ‘kitchen counter’ wines in an easy peasy wine jelly. We used Ça Beautage in ours for its deep red colour and earthy aromas, but white and rosé will work too. Dry wines are best suited to this recipe. The jelly is great in both savoury and sweet applications, though it really is best in a grown-up PB&J sandwich. Don’t be tempted to reduce the sugar – fruit pectin requires a certain amount in order to set to a jelly.


INGREDIENTS makes about 3 x 350ml jars

2 cups cups of wine

.25 cup of fresh squeezed lemon juice, strained of pulp and pips

1 pouch of liquid pectin

3.5 cups sugar

METHOD

1. First wash your jars and lids with hot soapy water. Rinse well and sterilize. We popped our clean, dry jars in a 275oF oven for 20 minutes.

2. Place the wine, lemon juice and sugar into a large saucepan and place over a medium heat, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Bring the mix to a gentle simmer then remove from the heat. Immediately stir in the pectin and mix well.

3. Using a sterilized funnel and glass measuring jug, carefully decant the hot liquid into the jars and seal immediately. Allow to cool entirely. The wine jelly will keep in a cool, dark place for many months. Refrigerate once opened.

By in tasting room events, offers, winery news Comments Off on Winemaker’s case 2018

Winemaker’s case 2018

Every year, we hand select 12 of our best sellers, award winners and new releases for inclusion in YOUR winemakers’s case. We hope you’ll enjoy sharing, and maybe even cellaring, some of Beaufort’s finest this festive season. There are a limited number of cases available, so call ahead to reserve yours on 250-338-1357, or email katie@beaufortwines.ca

The winemaker’s case is offered at the very special price of $231.60 +tax – a saving of 20% on tasting room prices* and shipping is available to select Canadian provinces. Here’s what you’ll get:


1 X 2015 Big Nose Red
1 X 2015 Beauhemian *OTHERWISE SOLD OUT*
2 X 2016 Epic *OTHERWISE SOLD OUT*
1 X 2016 Ortega *OTHERWISE SOLD OUT*
1 X 2016 Cab Franc *NEW RELEASE*
1 X 2016 Ça Beautage
1 X 2016 Franc Merlot
1 X 2017 Vintner’s Reserve Ortega *OTHERWISE SOLD OUT*
1 X 2017 Rosé *OTHERWISE SOLD OUT*
1 X 2017 Ortega *OTHERWISE SOLD OUT*
1 X 2017 Petite Milo


* Sorry, no trade outs, and no other discounts apply on bottles in the winemaker’s case.

By in pairing suggestion, recipes, whole food, plant-based Comments Off on Double Choc Cookies x mulled wine

Double Choc Cookies x mulled wine

These squidgy double chocolate cookies with toasted macadamias are just the ticket on a grey and chilly day, and even better paired with a glass of mulled wine. We love to infuse our Franc Merlot with Hornby Island Tea’s mulling spices – grab a sachet from the Comox Valley Farmers’ Market on Saturday mornings. 2016 Franc Merlot is available at select liquor stores on Vancouver Island, and in the tasting room in December (15th & 16th AND 22nd & 23rd).


INGREDIENTS Makes about 8 large cookies

1 tablespoon milled flax

1/4 cup water

1/4 cup sunflower oil

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 cup Demerara sugar

1 cup white flour

1/3 cup cocoa

1/2 tsp baking soda

pinch of salt

1/4 cup dark choc chips

1/4 cup macadamia nuts

METHOD

  1. Preheat oven to 350F.
  2. Place the nuts in a single layer on a small baking tray and toast for 10-15 minutes until aromatic and just starting to colour. Set aside to cool.
  3. Sift the flour, salt, baking powder and cocoa powder into a large bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk together the water, oil, vanilla, sugar and flax. Add the wet ingredients to the dry and mix together with a large spoon.
  4. Roughly chop the macadamia nuts and add them to the cookie mix along with the chocolate chips. Mix well.
  5. Use slightly wet hands to form the cookie dough into balls (we make 8 pretty large cookies with a single batch). Place the balls on 2 cookie sheets lined with parchment paper and place in a preheated oven for 15-20 minutes. Rotate the trays once during the bake time. When the cookies are done they will have a slightly cracked surface, but will still look a little squidgy in the centre.
  6. Leave the cookies to cool for 5 minutes on their trays before removing them to a wire rack. The cookies will keep for a week in an airtight container.

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