Beaufort Vineyard and Estate Winery

wine education

By in tasting room events, things to do in courtenay, winery news, wine education Comments Off on Private Virtual Tastings in December 2020

Private Virtual Tastings in December 2020

We are very excited to offer virtual wine tastings in December 2020. Enjoy a private guided tasting in the comfort of your own home over Zoom or Google Meet. Virtual tastings are possible in all provinces that allow direct to consumer wine shipments from BC. We can also host a tasting for multiple households simultaneously; if you are unable to get together with your friends and family in real life this holiday season, we can help… all for the love of Vancouver Island wine!

Here’s how it works:

  1. Head to our online store to preorder your wine selection for delivery (6 bottles minimum). If you have friends and family in other houses/provinces who want in on the action, let them know what bottles to order and we’ll ship tout suite. Live locally? You can also pick up from our store on our open days in December.
  2. Once you’ve purchased your bottles, contact Katie (katie@beaufortwines.ca) to secure your preferred date and time for your virtual tasting. Katie will then send you a Zoom or Google Meet invite.
  3. On the day of your tasting, the choice of what to open is yours! A winery representative will host your tasting, guiding you through 1-5 wines (again, the choice of how many bottles to open is entirely up to you). Assemble your family (or your friend bubble) in the comfort of your own home with bottles, glassware, and your favourite wine snacks. At the elected time, we’ll call in and guide you merrily through your chosen tasting bottles.

While our wine store WILL be open on three weekends in December, we will NOT be hosting tastings on-site. Virtual tastings will last a maximum of 1 hour (depending on the number of wines tasted). Please ensure you have downloaded (and tested!) the appropriate meeting app. A good internet connection, that is capable of supporting video, is essential. Virtual tastings are FREE – all wine orders placed between October 15th & December 20th (6 bottle minimum shipment) can opt to add-on a virtual tasting. Virtual tasting appointments are limited. T&Cs apply.

By in wine education Comments Off on Wine Tannins

Wine Tannins

Tannins are organic polyphenolic compounds that occur naturally in things like leaves, wood, nuts and certain fruits. Part of a plant’s defence mechanism, tannins are bitter tasting and astringent – in the natural world, they make things less tasty, and therefore less desirable, to both humans and animals. This allows the plant in question to establish itself and proliferate before someone (or something) gobbles it up.

If a wine is described as having a tannic structure, it will have had some contact with grape skins, seeds and stems during wine-making. Likely too, that it will have spent time aging in wood, for oak is rich in tannin. When it comes to tannins in wine – red wine – it’s a case of balance. Wines that are overly or aggressively tannic will dry your mouth out in a single sip; like you’ve just sucked the sleeve of a velvet smoking jacket. Tannins, you see, have this wonderful ability to dry out proteins – that dry, almost furry feeling in your mouth comes as a direct result of tannins going to work on amino acids in your saliva. Conversely, red wines with lower tannin levels can lack complexity. Since a major part of wine’s intrigue is what happens on your palate when you taste it, a little bit of astringency, a little bit of bitterness and certainly a little bit of ‘furriness’ is no bad thing, especially when you’re pairing red wine with food. It’s easy to counteract (or limit the effect of) tannins on your palate by pairing wines with protein rich foods. Fats also facilitate balancing tannins on the palate. Tannins are essential for a wine that’s intended for the cellar. Wines with no tannins, low tannins, or a ‘soft’ tannin profile will typically not age well at all.

Tannins in white wine are, usually, negligible. With a few notable exceptions (whites that have had extended maceration, and whites aged in wood), white wines are made in a way that limits the transfer of polyphenols from grape skins, seeds and stems to the actual juice.

And so, for a little experiment… cut open a new black tea bag and sprinkle the contents on your tongue. Chew on the dried leaves for a while before spitting it out. Note that furry sensation; that intense dryness and astringency; that bitterness and brownish residue on your tongue and teeth? Tannins!